The Story of the Grenadine Tie

Few articles of clothing can lift an outfit for a dressy look and yet help you tone things down for a casual getup. Yet, the Grenadine Tie does both effortlessly.

Versatile, suave and classy, the grenadine is the quintessential tie for all seasons. With its famous textured appearance, it rarely collides with other patterns, making it an excellent fallback option and a staple in many wardrobes.

Not nearly enough gets said about this elegant, understated accessory. So, today, we’re going to do a deep dive into the Grenadine Tie. Where does it come from and how do you wear it best? Here’s all about the grenadine.

Meet the Grenadine

First off, the grenadine actually gained popularity as a weave style. It is a variety of open weave produced with a gauze-style weave often referred to as a Cross weave or Leno weave. The style involves two vertical (warp) yarns twisted around horizontal (weft) yarns to create a strong yet breathable fabric.

Although some report that the unique structure of the grenadine is similar to the English gauze bobbinet tulle (the first machine-made gauze to be produced), original grenadine is currently produced exclusively in Como, Italy.

Man wearing suit and olive green garza fina grenadine tie
Grenadine garza fina in olive green

Today, the Grenadine Tie is possibly the most popular type of grenadine accessory. While the style has been used in several other articles of clothing, everyone loves a Grenadine Tie.

The ties are usually sewn entirely by hand, giving them great flexibility. Most of the ties are made from silk, although pretty much any fabric can be used – the most important quality of the tie is its weave style.

History

There’s a lot of speculation about the history of the Grenadine Tie, especially with its English heritage. The wooden looms used to produce grenadine weaves are usually referred to as Jacquard looms, although they are said to be descendants of the English Gauze machine. Till date, grenadine is described in Italian as “Garza a giro inglese” meaning “English weave gauze”.

Source: Fermo Fossati
Source: Fermo Fossati

Due to its sheer nature, grenadine was popular for tropical clothing. This led some to speculate that the weave style originated in Grenada, Spain, because of its name and hot weather. However, some of its earliest known use was in 18th century France when it was used in the form of a black lace fabric.

Grenadine has a long and prestigious history of use amongst some of the biggest names in the world. The two most renowned makes of grenadine in Como are Fermo Fossati and Seteria Bianchi.

Fossati is the oldest silk-making company in Italy and third oldest in Europe. Bianchi produced the fabrics for the Brioni jackets famously worn by Daniel Craig in the James Bond movie – Casino Royale. He’s not the only Bond to sport the grenadine either. Sean Connery has been known to favor the Grenadine Tie, especially the Garza Grossa.

Sean Connery wearing a garza grossa grenadine tie in From Russia With Love

Garza Grossa vs Garza Fina

The two most common types of the Grenadine Tie are the Garza Grossa and Garza Fina. What’s the difference between the two? Garza Grossa literally translates to mean “large gauze” while Garza Fina is “fine gauze”.

As the names imply, the difference between both varieties is down to how much texture you like in your ties. Garza Grossa ties have more visible texture (almost similar to a knitted tie). This gives them a slightly less formal look and makes the tie knot a bit larger than finer grenadines.

Navy garza grossa grenadine tie and navy garza fina grenadine tie
Garza grossa vs Garza fina

Garza Fina specimens tend to have a less visible texture and often appear more like smooth solids. They tend to look more formal, especially when made with silk and make much smaller knots.

Grenadine tie vs knitted tie

Although more textured Grenadine Ties look somewhat similar to knitted ties, there’s a world of difference between them. For one, it can be a bit difficult to make a knitted tie work on a formal outfit. Garza Grossa ties always have a greater formality than knitted ties.

Apart from this, there’s a clear difference between Garza Fina and traditional knitted ties. They won’t get caught on objects easily like knitted ties, although you may face this with Garza Grossa ties.

That said, Grenadine Ties (of whatever texture) will be a smashing addition to your wardrobe at any time. Their versatility and understated elegance make them a perfect choice for any occasion, making them an acquisition you will treasure for life.

How to wear the grenadine tie

The great thing about grenadines is there’s no absolute, cast-iron way to wear them. They can also be dyed in almost any color imaginable and this lets you try out your grenadine on almost any outfit.

Since most are made of refined silk, they provide a shine that can lift any attire and yet provide a texture that helps you dress down when you want to. You may vary your style with a Garza Grossa for a slightly less formal look or go with a Garza Fina to wow your colleagues at work.

Man wearing grey suit, denim shirt and navy grenadine tie with polkadots
Grenadine garza fina in navy with polkadots
Man wearing bottle green garza fina grenadine tie with white button down shirt
Grenadine garza fina in bottle green

Although whichever you prefer, you’ll be just as classy in a business suit or with a button down shirt and a dapper tweed jacket.

Conclusion

So that’s it. All you should know about the Grenadine Tie. If, like us, you just can’t get enough of the grenadine, reach out to us. We’d be delighted to answer your questions and direct you on where to get your hands on a couple of these.

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